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Archived post

Tuesday, February 28, 2006

The Gift of Health for Nurses



Gifting yourself with health and wellness will better improve your clients, your colleagues, and your own well-being. Assessing personal health needs should include physical, emotional, mental (information gathering), social, spiritual and environmental dimensions. Nurses who practice meditation can improve their physical, emotional, and mental health potentially influencing the nurse-patient relationship (Tayor, 2006). Advocate for peaceful and natural settings and views in your break areas and workplace. Recent evidence indicates nurses with access to a natural environment onsite demonstrate increased well-being and job satisfaction (Irvine, 2004; McUsic, 2006; Ulrich, 2002).

Kathlynn Northrup-Snyder, RN, CNS, PhD
Oregon

References:

Irvine, K. N. (2004). Work breaks and well-being: The effect of nature on hospital nurses. Dissertation, University of Michigan.

McUsic, T. (Jan, 16, 2004). Nature’s healing touch: Garden views benefit hospital patients and staff. Nurse Week: Mountain West, 10-11.

Taylor, S. (Jan 30, 2006) Research reveals the benefits of meditation. Nurse Week: Mountain West, 17-18.

Ulrich, R. S. (2002). OR design & construction. What do we know about healing environments? Oregon Manager. 18, 17-9.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Tuesday, February 28, 2006   Post only 

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Archived post

Sunday, February 26, 2006

ADVANCE For Nurses Runs Story on National Nurse



Thanks to writer Annie Nowlin and ADVANCE for Nurses for running a story this past week, titled A Top Nurse. The article clearly defines what the Office of the National Nurse will accomplish-delivering the message of health promotion and prevention to every American. At a time when millions are uninsured, epidemic proportions of preventable diseases run rampant, and healthcare costs continue to rise, nurses must step up, use our voices and advocate for the public's health. The National Nurse proposal adds one additional public health nurse coordinator to every state to coordinate the work of the Office with the National Nurse teams to help disseminate education to every community. No American will be left behind in healthcare as the educational messages will be broadcast on television, radio, and then put on the Internet in multiple languages. The National Nurse teams will direct four free educational programs in their own communities all occuring simulaneously nationwide to repeat the message face to face with members of the public.

We can and we will make a difference by saving lives and dollars. Health must be our nation's number one priority.
Please support our efforts by visiting Cafe Press and purchasing a button, magnet, mug, bumper sticker, mousepad, or bear.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Sunday, February 26, 2006   Post only 

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Archived post

Saturday, February 25, 2006

From A National Nurse Supporter: Wondering If There Is A Way to Help Support Our Troops


Soldiers in Iraq must be having a very scary week, with the situation there deteriorating so rapidly. And the medical units must be running on exhaustion.

I am thinking these days of my friends' son Aaron who left for Iraq in November when his firstborn daughter was only two weeks old. He's younger than our youngest, so about age 21. I've been wishing we knew how he is, and wondering how to ease the strain on our friends here in Vermont.

Well, I just got word through my sister Patti, who served as a nurse in Kuwait and is now an Air Force Captain, that there are some specific items that a medical unit serving injured soldiers could use. It might take a little of the strain out of this time to do something which is kind and useful, at least to add a little balance to the Universe.

If you would like to send something, here are the particulars, which come from Capt. Maureen A. McCann, Life Skills Nurse. Typical of a nurse, Maureen says, "Many of you are asking what you can send, do we need anything? Well, we don't, but our patients do."

She elaborates, saying: Many can't continue to wear the uniforms they come in with and do not have anything else. Here is a list of what we can use (many of you are connecting with your church or job, but even one set is great!).

Large size:
Sweat pants
long sleeve T-shirts
T-shirts
gym shorts (blue, black, gray only; they need to be conservative due to the area we are in)
mens underpants
small pillows (great for stuffing under or around the patient's injuries/casts to make them more comfortable for their long flight while they are on a litter.)

(We get tons of socks and toiletries.)

THANKS SO MUCH!


Mailing address for packages:

Capt Maureen McCann
332 AEW/CASF
APO AE 09315-9997

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Saturday, February 25, 2006   Post only 

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Archived post

Wednesday, February 22, 2006

Alarming Statistics



Today's Oregonian reported some alarming statistics related to how much health care is projected to cost by 2015. Every American should pay attention to the disconcerting fact that our elderly population will spend one in every five dollars to stay well, and that the country's total health care bill will increase to more than $4 trillion in the next ten years as reported by Health Affairs, a journal published by the Center for American Progress.

Imagine what a message to the public from an Office of the National Nurse would do in terms of helping Americans to practice health ways of living to prevent the epidemic levels of preventable diseases such as obesity and Type 2 diabetes from occurring. We can and we must do better.

Please stand with us by signing the petition on this website and submitting your email to receive our newsletter updates about the progress we are making. Consider making a donation to the National Nursing Network Organization to support our efforts. Volunteer to submit new graphics for our merchandise on Cafe Press. If you are interested in purchasing inexpensive ad space about a health related business that you would like others to know about on this website, please write teri@nationalnurse.info for information on how to do this.

Stay tuned, another newsletter will be coming out early next week.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Wednesday, February 22, 2006   Post only 

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Blogger listener 
Type 2 diabetes runs rampant in my family.

Thanks so much for caring!
Nurses ROCK!

Support the National Nurse!
Blogger listener 
WONDERING IF THERE'S A WAY TO ACTUALLY HELP THE TROOPS?

Soldiers in Iraq must be having a very scary week, with the situation there deteriorating so rapidly. And the medical units must be running on exhaustion.

I am thinking these days of my friends' son Aaron who left for Iraq in November when his firstborn daughter was only two weeks old. He's younger than our youngest, so about age 21. I've been wishing we knew how he is, and wondering how to ease the strain on our friends here in Vermont.

Well, I just got word through my sister Patti, who served as a nurse in Kuwait and is now an Air Force Captain, that there are some specific items that a medical unit serving injured soldiers could use. It might take a little of the strain out of this time to do something which is kind and useful, at least to add a little balance to the Universe.

If you would like to send something, here are the particulars, which come from Capt. Maureen A. McCann, Life Skills Nurse. Typical of a nurse, Maureen says, "Many of you are asking what you can send, do we need anything? Well, we don't, but our patients do."

She elaborates, saying: Many can't continue to wear the uniforms they come in with and do not have anything else. Here is a list of what we can use (many of you are connecting with your church or job, but even one set is great!).

Large size:
Sweat pants
long sleeve T-shirts
T-shirts
gym shorts (blue, black, gray only; they need to be conservative due to the area we are in)
mens underpants
small pillows (great for stuffing under or around the patient's injuries/casts to make them more comfortable for their long flight while they are on a litter.)

(We get tons of socks and toiletries.)

THANKS SO MUCH!


Mailing address for packages:

Capt Maureen McCann
332 AEW/CASF
APO AE 09315-9997


Archived post

Monday, February 20, 2006

Oregon Student Nurses Association State Convention


The Oregon Student Nurses Association Board of Directors invited Lillian Gonzalez, RN, BSN, from Nevada to give the keynote address for the Saturday night dinner. We wanted to share with you a portion of Lillian's inspirational speech with you:

"Indeed, healthcare is in crises. And we nurses are in a perfect position to help save it. We are the largest sector of healthcare. We have unique and special skills and insights to offer the public. We have a way of incorporating body, mind, and spirit into health recovery unlike any other healthcare discipline. We understand that preventive medicine is better than reactive medicine; that quality of life matters. An Office of the National Nurse would be possibly the most significant way to utilize our collective vast wealth of knowledge to improve the health of our nation. And I hope that you, as new leaders of the nursing profession will feel a calling to see it happen during your career."

The National Nurse Team also presented the proposal during two forums that took place yesterday. Judging by the caliber of student nurses attending this conference, the future of nursing is in very good hands indeed.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Monday, February 20, 2006   Post only 

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Anonymous Anne Nowlin 
That the Oregon Student Nurses Board of Directors invited Lillian Gonzalez, BSN to give thier keynote address speaks volumes for their integrity and professionalism. Ms. Gonzalez has the respect of the nursing comnumity and has spoken with many nurse leaders in attempts to solve some ills of our critically ill healthcare system.

For some years, Ms. Gonzalez has been an activist and advocate for all nurses and has spoken and written of nursing.

Hers is a voice worth heeding by student nurses as Lillian speaks with passion and from the heart; but also, she speaks from an objective viewpoint, gained from knowing facts and having spoken and studied with nurse leaders.

Anne Nowlin, BSN


Archived post

Thursday, February 16, 2006

Nurses: Send Us Your Health Tips



Our last newsletter went out on Valentine's Day and we received many emails in response. One of our supporters who is not a nurse recommended we begin to role model what we see the Office of the National Nurse accomplishing each week in its broadcast messages. An Oregonian wrote, "Include a serious and unique health tip at the start of each email to start showing people now the value there will be in having a National Nurse."

We have already invited our first nurse expert to share a health tip with us and this will go out to you in our next newsletter.

Let's all begin to help keep Americans and each other well. If you are nurse expert, please submit your health tip for wellness including references for your tip to us at teri@nationalnurse.info so we can share this in our newsletter and on our website. Include your name, title, state, and a small picture in jpg or gif format.

Let's work together and begin to put the health back into healthcare!

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Thursday, February 16, 2006   Post only 

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Blogger listener 
The health tip is a great idear!

How about allowing average citizens to pose a health question that nurses can address at the start of the newsletter, thus highlighting the interaction between the people and this nation's marvelous nurses?
Blogger listener 
OOPS!

That should read "GREAT idear!"

I thought I had italicised the word "great" but must've ended wrongly. Maybe the first question should be how to properly italicise? (LOL! Just kidding.)
Anonymous Anonymous 
I think listener has a great idea. It would be nice to be able to post question then have the nurses either in the newsletter or on the website post article links, health info, etc.


Archived post

Tuesday, February 14, 2006

National Nurse Team Responds to American Nursing Association



The National Nurse Team would like to use this post to respond to the op/ed written by the American Nurses Association that was published in the Nevada RNformation Feb-Apr 2006. We want to thank the American Nurses Association for their committment to their role in advocating for nurses, and we support their continued efforts.

Indeed there are many difficult issues facing nurses and we value all the associations that are working hard, and achieving gradual but true success, to improve the working conditions, ratios, and empowerment issues facing nurses.

We were happy to read the recent statement by the ANA about the National Nurse proposal because it underscores the need for more information sharing and clarity. The National Nurse proposal focuses on bringing education and accurate health information to the public; nurses doing what they do daily, at the bedside or for their communities, for the entire country.

It is our hope that you will read the proposal and after it in it's entirety, it will be clear how this is not an effort purely for nurses but an effort by nurses for all Americans.

CREATE AN OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL NURSE TO ADVOCATE FOR, EDUCATE, AND EMPOWER AMERICAN HEALTH CARE CONSUMERS

Request: Create an Office of the National Nurse to focus on providing all Americans with preventive health care resources.
The office is necessary to acknowledge the critical role nurses play in hands-on patient care and education. The Office of the National Nurse would provide Americans with the tools to prevent disease and effectively manage chronic illness thereby reducing utilization of health care resources. The National Nurse will oversee state coordinators who will assemble nurse teams to provide screening, education and referral services in their communities.

Nurses treat people in their response to wellness, disease or injury and do this through collaboration with physicians and other health care service providers. The Office of the National Nurse will function similarly in a complementary role with the Office of the Surgeon General and other current agencies providing health care services.

Background: There are 44 million uninsured Americans and millions more are underinsured, leaving large gaps in people's access to primary and preventive care services. Americans who are insured may have limited understanding of the importance of primary or preventive health care services. Nurses know the importance of outreach and integrating patient and family education into their care for every patient. Studies demonstrate that when nurses provide early intervention, educate and work closely with patients, patients require fewer hospital and emergency care visits. (Palmer, Appleton, Rodrigues, 2003; Cherry, Moffatt, Rodriguez & Dryden, 2002) Nurses overseeing and promoting preventative care will decrease the need for hospitalizations, thereby reducing utilization of Medicare and Medicaid dollars. (Collins & Wadhwa, 2005) Ultimately, fewer nurses would be needed to provide "sick care" at the hospital or nursing home bedside, thus lessening the impact of the current nursing shortage.

Community based nurse led health services focusing on identification and early intervention have been shown to prevent unnecessary admissions to hospitals, reduce length of stay of necessary hospital admissions, and improve patients' ability to function while enjoying a higher quality of life. (Young, 2005)

There are 2.7 million nurses who work on the front lines in the United States health care system. Even though they are one of the largest groups of health care service providers in the nation, nurses hold too few positions of influence to have a national large-scale impact on the nation's health. The Office of the National Nurse integrates Nursing's Agenda for the Future (2002) as proposed by nineteen national nursing associations and organizations that call for an improvement of the image and value of the nursing profession. The activities of the Office, as well as the National Nurse, will fulfill this objective by portraying nursing as a nationally respected and valued career.

Also in Nursing's Agenda for the Future (2002)one of the objectives calls for achieving nursing's desired future state by creating "a process that provides for ongoing communication, collaboration, support and monitoring of the overall plan activities within the nursing community and among other health professions, the health care industry, and health care consumers."(p.9)

Plan: Create an Office of the National Nurse to promote and coordinate opportunities for the nation's registered nurses and licensed practical nurses to collaborate in community-based Nurse Teams. Nurse Teams will utilize the traditional nursing approach that focuses on assessing the individual's overall physical and mental state of health and working with the patient to achieve a positive outcome in accessing health services.

The Nurse Teams will be responsible for the implementation of four educational programs per year which have been identified by the National Nurse through collaboration with the Surgeon General's office and other members of the health professions, including but not limited to members of the nursing and medical professions, pharmacists, nutritionists, health educators, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, pharmaceutical companies and hospital associations.

These programs will occur nationwide simultaneously to raise awareness and increase participation. For instance, if obesity/diabetes screening is the top national health priority, then the National Nurse would direct the State Coordinators who would direct their Nursing Teams in presenting the educational program in churches, supermarkets, schools, senior centers, libraries and other accessible locations in their communities. Any licensed nurse in the country would be allowed to receive training to participate and these educational programs will be designed to reach every American instead of a targeted population.

State Nurse Teams will include nurses prepared at all educational levels and will represent diverse populations. Programs will foremost focus on keeping Americans healthy by providing education about how identify their individual wellness needs, understand how to access available health services, and how to navigate the myriad of choices to better care for themselves.

Programs will improve quality of care by helping identify the special needs of communities including but not limited to geriatric and culturally diverse populations. As members of their community, nurses are better able to identify and target the diverse needs of the patients they serve.

The Office of the National Nurse, as a center, will share and disseminate information and collect data from the Nursing Teams to assist government agencies such as the CDC with their ongoing research. The Nurse Teams will focus on educating Americans using "best practices" to improve their health while reducing costs.

Nurses identified as "experts" from the National Nurse Teams will present one health education topic to the American people each week. The expert is defined as a nurse who has the educational background and practice experience to represent the health topic information to be delivered. These weekly educational pieces will be available for broadcast and on the Internet in different languages to reach America's diverse population. The goal is to create the most massive community outreach ever conducted by nurses.

Role:

The National Nurse will serve as spokesperson, publicizing the distinct role of nursing, and encouraging nurses to become involved in grassroots activities and educating the American public about the services provided by the Office. Educating the public about nursing's pivotal role in health care will be basic to involving nurses in health care policy formulation and in key business decisions that affect nursing's future." (Nursing's Agenda for the Future, 2002, p 10)

The National Nurse will be responsible for collaborating with members of the nursing community and other health care providers to determine priorities for the National Nurse Teams' community-based programs.

The National Nurse will identify state coordinators for each of the states that will be responsible for ensuring the volunteer activity is disseminated to the grassroots level.

Through the Office of the National Nurse, nurses from around the country will sign up indicating the state they are licensed from and their willingness to serve on a Nurse Team in their community.

The National Nurse will choose an expert nurse to address the nation via a public service announcement on pertinent health care topics.

The National Nurse will actively recruit qualified individuals into the profession and encourage nurses to become nurse educators through media campaigns and public appearances.

The National Nurse will work with other interested persons and departments to promote policy that would improve the nation's health.

The Office of the National Nurse will collect data to demonstrate the success of the National Nurse Team activities.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Tuesday, February 14, 2006   Post only 

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Archived post

Sunday, February 12, 2006

Ways to Support the National Nurse Proposal


Thank you to everyone who has been writing and asking us about ways they can help us move the National Nurse proposal forward. Here are a few suggestions, and once we have a piece of legislation, we will add an action center to the website with more specific information.

1. Submit your email to receive our newsletter. There is a new one going out tomorrow, Feb. 13th so don't delay.

2. Consider buying a bumper sticker, teeshirt, mug, or buttons at www.cafepress.com/nationalnurse

3. Make a contribution to help us with traveling expenses, videostreaming our presentation, and the costs of our daily operation (newsletter, website, mailings, long distance phone calls, printing, etc.) See the link on the left side of the blog or send an email to teri@nationalnurse.info to mail a check to the National Nursing Network Organization. We are a non profit corporation and are not tax exempt, so your contributions are not tax deductible.

4. Email us to receive a copy of your own downloadable poster that you can print copies of right in the comfort of your own home.

5. Ask to get on the agenda for your own organization's meeting and speak to others about what the National Nurse is about. Many are doing just that, and we have materials to help.

6. We have a huge stack of postcards ready to mail to our members of Congress, so if you would like some of these mailed to you, send us an email.

7. Many are asking for a story about the National Nurse, so if you enjoy writing and would like to pursue this, please email us.

We appreciate the help of so many, Renee in Ohio and Cheryl in Arizona, for helping us with this website; Moses in Portland, for helping us to get our newsletter to you; the OR Student Nursing Association for inviting us to speak at their annual convention next week; and of course, Representative Lois Capps (D-CA) and her dedicated and hard-working staff.

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Sunday, February 12, 2006   Post only 

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Tuesday, February 07, 2006

Vermont Nurse Connection


Thank you to the Vermont Nursing Association for publishing an article about the National Nurse written by nurse writer, Lillian Gonzalez. Ms. Gonzalez provides the background information for an Office of the National Nurse and describes the activities the Office will partake in. Perhaps the most compelling paragraph is this:

"Conditions are perfect for America to achieve the highest level of wellness a nation can attain. But to realize an Office of the National Nurse, the nursing community must unite. Every person can get involved and make a difference. One nurse by the name of Lois Capps, Representative for California's 23rd Congressional District, has taken a crucial first step. In an official statement, Congresswoman Capps stated that she not only supports efforts to create a National Nurse, but "(is) currently working on legislation to do so." By uniting across the country, the nursing profession can accomplish what could potentially be the most important piece of legislation not only to the nursing profession, but also to the wellness of our country. Unity among nurses across the country is essential. According to the Congresswoman, "grassroots advocacy will be essential once we have a bill to introduce to Congress."

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Tuesday, February 07, 2006   Post only 

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Blogger listener 
VERMONT loves the National Nurse!


Archived post

Thursday, February 02, 2006

PCC's American Association of Women in Community Colleges Meeting


Yesterday, Alisa and Teri were given the privilege of presenting about the National Nurse Campaign to members of the Portland Community College AAWCC Chapter. We had a brief opportunity at the end to hear some of their feedback. The response was one of excitement and hope. As educators, hope for a healthier America is something we all care about. The Office of the National Nurse is meant to be one solution to helping Americans stay healthy.

If you would like us to speak to your group, please drop us an email at teri@nationalnurse.info

The National Nursing Network Organization Team—Thursday, February 02, 2006   Post only 

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Anonymous Anonymous 
Just what we need another bloated government agency.